Update on Death Certificate filing

 (posted 3/28/2017)

Update:  Electronic Death Certificate filing reaches over 2,600 users

Next goal:  Have death events filed in 10 days

Kansas physicians are successfully making the transition to filing death certificates electronically, since the requirements changed January 1st of this year.  The Office of Vital Statistics reports an impressive increase from less than 500 physicians using the VRVweb Electronic Death Record System in July of 2016 (the law effective date of HB 2518) to over 2,600 users as of March 2017. Partnering organizations, the Kansas Healthcare Collaborative and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, worked with facilities across the state to coordinate training opportunities to help physicians and staff comply with the mandate.  These efforts have proven successful.
 
The next challenge is to meet CDC's directive that 80 percent of all death events be filed within 10 days.  For the month of February 2017, the Office of Vital Statistics reported the highest completion month, ever, of 62.8 percent of death events being filed within 10 days.  Kansas is on its way to reach the 80 percent threshold.
 
Beginning January 1, 2017, the state of Kansas requires that all death certificates must be filed electronically.  To comply with this statutory change, all physicians who certify death certificates must register with the Office of Vital Statistics at the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.  The links for registration and training can be found on the Kansas Healthcare Collaborative website, khconline.org/news.

 

KHC supports 39+ weeks

posted 2/8/17

Recognizing Kansas hospitals’ achievements

through the 39-plus Weeks Banner Program

TOPEKA – The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Bureau of Family Health, the March of Dimes and the Kansas Healthcare Collaborative (KHC) have joined together to encourage continued progress towards eliminating early elective deliveries (EED) in Kansas. Together, the organizations support Kansas birthing hospitals in adopting the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) guidelines that highlight the importance of allowing babies to reach 39 weeks gestation through the elimination of elective labor inductions and cesarean sections.

More than 30 years ago, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published guidelines on the importance of allowing babies to reach 39 weeks gestation to optimize brain and organ development and improve neonatal outcomes. Unfortunately, even as recently as 2012, some providers still were inducing labor or performing cesarean sections prior to 39 weeks gestation without medical necessity. Kansas hospitals and providers have taken the lead in reversing that trend.

In recent years, Kansas hospitals have moved to adopt best practices in line with the ACOG guidelines. The collaborative efforts and hard work of hospitals have resulted in a rapid and significant reduction in the statewide EED rate from eight percent in 2013 to two percent in 2015.

The March of Dimes’ national Hospital Banner Recognition Program is designed to recognize hospitals that have achieved EED rates below five percent, and Kansas hospitals are invited to participate. Hospitals that complete a simple checklist and meet the criteria will receive a customized banner that commends the hospital for commitment to improving the quality of care for moms and babies. Each hospital also will receive a press kit from the March of Dimes so that patients, families, community leaders and donors are aware of the hospital’s commitment to the health of the community.

“This laudable achievement deserves recognition, and KDHE is proud to supply banners at no cost to qualifying hospitals,” said Susan Mosier, KDHE Secretary and State Health Officer. For more information, click here.

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About Early Elective Delivery (EED)

Babies born preterm, before 37 completed weeks of gestation, are at increased risk of immediate life-threatening health problems, as well as long-term complications and developmental delays. Among preterm infants, complications that can occur during the newborn period include respiratory distress, jaundice, anemia and infection, while long-term complications can include learning and behavioral problems, cerebral palsy, lung problems and vision and hearing loss. As a result of these risks, preterm birth is a leading cause of infant death and childhood disability. Although the risk of complications is greatest among those babies who are born the earliest, even those babies born “late preterm” (34 to 36 weeks’ gestation) and "early term" (37 and 38 weeks' gestation) are more likely than full-term babies to

experience morbidity and mortality. In 2015, 66 Kansas births per week were preterm (8.8 percent of all births), and 179 were early elective deliveries.

About the March of Dimes

The March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. For more than 75 years, moms and babies have benefited from March of Dimes research, education, vaccines and breakthroughs. To participate in our annual signature fundraising event, visit marchforbabies.org. For the latest resources and health information, visit our websites marchofdimes.org and nacersano.org. You can also find us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

About the Kansas Healthcare Collaborative

KHC is a nonprofit organization with a mission dedicated to transforming health care through patient-centered initiatives that improve quality, safety and value. KHC was formed in 2008 by the Kansas Hospital Association and the Kansas Medical Society as a resource to enhance health care provided to Kansans. With the support of the Kansas Medical Society and the Kansas Hospital Association, KHC is seen as the lead organization in Kansas for health care quality improvement education, evaluation and measurement. The KHC mission is to engage and align providers in delivering quality health care and outcomes.

About the Kansas Department of Health & Environment, Bureau of Family Health

The KDHE Bureau of Family Health is responsible for administering the Title V Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Services Block Grant for the State of Kansas. The Title V MCH program plays a key role in the provision of maternal and child health services in Kansas and targets activities to improve the health of all women and infants. Find more information at kansasmch.org or kdheks.gov/bfh. You can also find us on Facebook (Kansas Maternal & Child Health).

Electronic Death Certificate filing required as of January 2017

As of January 1, 2017, all death certificates in the state of Kansas must be filed electronically.   To comply with this statutory change, all physicians who certify death certificates need to register with the Office of Vital Statistics at the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

To submit electronic records to the state department of health, physicians and any of their designated assistants will need to have completed a user agreement application.  

Click here for a PDF of the Physician User Agreement
Click here for a PDF of the Assistants User Agreement
Click here for a PDF of the EDRS Web Application Training Manual

Completed documents can be submitted to or faxed to 785-559-4217. Afterwards, you will receive an email with additional information to log on to the system.

For additional information or training opportunities visit: http://www.kdheks.gov/vital/index.html or contact the Office of Vital Statistics, Diana Baldry, Chief of Registration, 785-296-1426.

Flu vaccine coverage among health care workers continues to rise

More than 9 out of 10 Kansas health care workers are protecting themselves and their patients from the flu by receiving the influenza vaccination. According to the Kansas Healthcare Collaborative, its statewide survey of Kansas hospitals indicates 92.3 percent of health care workers were immunized during the 2015-16 flu season, compared to 91.0 percent in 2014-15. 

The survey of 141 Kansas hospitals included all groups of health care workers, including hospital staff, physicians, students, volunteers and others, such as licensed independent practitioners and contractors who work within the hospital setting. All but four hospitals responded to the KHC’s eighth annual survey for a 96.5 percent response rate. chart

The 1.3 percent statewide increase over the previous year’s immunization rate reflects a positive trend. It also compares favorably with the national rate for acute care hospitals, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates to be 91.2 percent for the 2015-16 flu season.

In contrast, the first statewide survey KHC conducted in 2009 found that only 64 percent of health care workers and medical staff were immunized against the flu. Since 2008, KHC has campaigned to increase the number of hospital health care workers receiving seasonal influenza vaccinations as part of its statewide efforts to decrease health care-associated infections. KHC is working with hospitals to achieve a 100 percent immunization rate by providing education, encouraging adoption of best practices and facilitating resource sharing.

“We are pleased to continue seeing progress in hospitals across the state, yet we still have work to do,” said Kendra Tinsley, KHC executive director. “The flu can be serious, and by getting vaccinated, individuals working within the health care setting can help protect not only themselves, but their patients, as well as their families at home.”

Several leading national health care and patient safety organizations have recommended that all hospital health care personnel, including medical staff, receive the seasonal influenza vaccine—a key measure in preventing the spread of influenza.

A vaccination policy for health care personnel remains the largest single factor for increasing vaccination rates among hospitals, according to the CDC. The KHC survey confirmed this finding with more than one-third of all hospitals having a policy, and more making plans to adopt one.

The most frequently used methods by Kansas hospitals for ensuring all personnel are immunized include providing education about the flu vaccine, sending reminders, and monitoring progress facility-wide.                                                                

National recommendations and resources for hospitals are available on the KHC website at www.khconline.org/initiatives/immunization-project.

KHC is a provider-led 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to transform health care through patient-centered initiatives that improve quality, safety and value. Founded in 2008 by the Kansas Hospital Association and the Kansas Medical Society, KHC embodies the commitment of two of the state’s leading health care provider groups to act as a resource and to continuously enhance the quality of care provided to Kansans. For more information about the Kansas Healthcare Collaborative visit www.khconline.org.

Posted October 11, 2016.

KHC selected to lead Kansas patient safety improvement efforts

Hospital Improvement Innovation Networks to continue patient safety efforts
started under the Partnership for Patients initiative

The Kansas Healthcare Collaborative has been selected to continue leading hospital patient safety improvement efforts statewide, announced Kendra Tinsley, executive director. KHC will be working on behalf of the Kansas Hospital Association as one of 31 state hospital associations partnering with the Health Research & Educational Trust (HRET) of the American Hospital Association to lead this work.

Over the next two to three years, HRET and its partners will participate in a new round of a national program that has been successful in reducing patient harm and readmissions. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) yesterday announced $347 million in awards to continue patient safety efforts through the new Hospital Improvement Innovation Networks (HIINs).

“KHC embraces the opportunity to continue its patient safety work with Kansas hospitals through the newly announced Hospital Improvement Innovation Networks,” Tinsley said. “This initiative has been an extraordinary example of what happens when we collaborate to make our care systems safer and better, using our health care dollars more effectively.”

The HIIN contracts will build upon the collective momentum of the Hospital Engagement Networks and Quality Improvement Organizations to reduce patient harm and readmissions. Through 2019, the HIINs will work to achieve a 20 percent decrease in overall patient harm and a 12 percent reduction in 30-day hospital readmissions from 2014 baselines. In addition, efforts to address health equity for Medicare beneficiaries will be central to the HIIN efforts. CMS will monitor and evaluate the activities to ensure HIINs are generating results and improving patient safety.

“We have made significant progress in keeping patients safe – an estimated 2.1 million fewer patients harmed, 87,000 lives saved, and nearly $20 billion in cost-savings from 2010 to 2014 – and we are focused on accelerating improvement efforts,” said Patrick Conway, M.D., CMS acting principal deputy administrator and chief medical officer. “The work of the Hospital Improvement and Innovation Networks will allow us to continue to improve health care safety across the nation and reduce readmissions at a national scale – keeping people as safe and healthy as possible.”

CMS selected 16 organizations to lead HIINs.  They are (listed in alphabetical order):

  • Carolinas Healthcare System
  • Dignity Health
  • Healthcare Association of New York State
  • HealthInsight
  • The Health Research and Educational Trust of the American Hospital Association
  • Health  Research and Educational Trust of New Jersey
  • Health Services Advisory Group
  • The Hospital and Healthsystem Association of Pennsylvania
  • Iowa Healthcare Collaborative
  • Michigan Health & Hospital Association (MHA) Health Foundation
  • Minnesota Hospital Association
  • Ohio Children’s Hospitals’ Solutions for Patient Safety
  • Ohio Hospital Association
  • Premier, Inc.
  • Vizient, Inc.
  • Washington State Hospital Association

The Partnership for Patients model is one of the first models established in 2011 to be tested under the authority of section 1115A of the Social Security Act (the Act) with the goal of reducing program expenditures while preserving or enhancing the quality of care. Since the launch of the Partnership for Patients and the work of Hospital Engagement Networks in collaboration with many other stakeholders, the vast majority of U.S. hospitals have delivered results as demonstrated by the achievement of unprecedented national reductions in harm. CMS believes that the upcoming work of the Hospital Improvement Innovation Networks, working as part of the Quality Improvement Organization’s work to improve patient safety and the quality of care in the Medicare program, will continue the great strides made in improving care provided to beneficiaries.   

For more information on the Partnership for Patients and the Hospital Improvement Innovation Networks, please visit: partnershipforpatients.cms.gov.

KHC is a provider-led 501(c)3 organization with a mission to transform health care through patient-centered initiatives that improve quality, safety and value. Founded in 2008 by the Kansas Hospital Association and the Kansas Medical Society, KHC embodies the commitment of two of the state’s leading health care provider groups to act as a resource and continuously enhance the quality of care provided to Kansans. For more information about the Kansas Healthcare Collaborative and its initiatives, visit www.khconline.org.

For more information on the Kansas Healthcare Collaborative, please visit: www.khconline.org.

 

Posted October 3, 2016.